Affective Animals

Transspecies Encounters in Modern British Animal Writing

Authors

  • Graham Huggan

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.52537/humanimalia.9436

Abstract

British animal writing is among the most popular of its kind in the world, including such household names as Williamson, Maxwell, and Durrell. It is hardly reassuring, however, for either younger or older readers. Drawing on some recent examples mostly written after the Second World War, this essay makes the case for modern British animal writing as a genre less likely to reveal our capacity to reach out to nonhuman others than to comment –– sometimes devastatingly –– on the modern dissociated sensibility: our otherness to ourselves.

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Author Biography

Graham Huggan

Graham Huggan teaches in the School of English at the University of Leeds (UK), where his research straddles three fields: postcolonial studies, tourism studies, and environmental humanities. His latest book is Colonialism, Culture, Whales: The Cetacean Quartet (Bloomsbury, 2018), and he is currently working on a co-authored study of modern British nature writing for Cambridge University Press.

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Published

2020-09-10

How to Cite

Huggan, G. (2020). Affective Animals: Transspecies Encounters in Modern British Animal Writing. Humanimalia, 12(1), 210–235. https://doi.org/10.52537/humanimalia.9436

Issue

Section

Articles