Native American Ethology and Animal Protectionist Rhetoric in the Long Enlightenment

Authors

  • Thomas Doran

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.52537/humanimalia.9421

Abstract

This article explores how ethnographic writing and travel narratives in the long eighteenth century sometimes revealed and other times concealed the influence of Native American folk zoology on scientific knowledge and practice. I argue that various forms of animal-protectionist rhetoric emerged alongside a developing study of animal behavior in the period 1700–1812 as a result of the complex interaction of Euro-colonial and Native American knowledge systems and ethical practices.

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Author Biography

Thomas Doran

Thomas Doran is Assistant Professor in Residence of Environmental Literature at Rhode Island School of Design. He teaches courses on early American ecology, natural history, environmental theory, comics art, and the cultural intersections of environmental justice and animal protection.

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Published

2020-09-10

How to Cite

Doran, T. (2020). Native American Ethology and Animal Protectionist Rhetoric in the Long Enlightenment. Humanimalia, 12(1), 1–49. https://doi.org/10.52537/humanimalia.9421

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Section

Articles